Equine Laminitis

Equine Laminitis

Have you noticed changes in your horse's gait? Are they showing signs of fatigue or are disinterested in exercising? Equine laminitis is inflammation of the sensitive and insensitive laminae in horse's feet and generally occurs bilaterally in the front feet. This multi-faceted issue tends to run in heavier breeds such as draft horses as well as morgans, ponies, miniature horses and donkeys. Because laminae protect the coffin bone, when it is weakened, the wall to bone connection can become disrupted and sink. This situation can eventually lead to penetration of the sole. Your horse does not have to live with this painful condition. Particular equine lifestyle concerns such as nutrition play one of the most significant roles in how laminitis develops and is controlled.

While certain risk factors such as Cushing's Disease, severe colic, other injuries that affect gait and high fever can significantly contribute to the formation of laminitis, many horse owners are shocked to learn their feeding rituals could be the major cause of the condition. Allowing horses to grain-load by feeding themselves without supervision or feeding excessive amounts all at once are serious risk factors that often lead to equine laminitis. While changing feeding behavior immediately can significantly help prevent future inflammation, damaging effects to the laminae may have set in.

If your horse exhibits the following, they may be experiencing laminitis:
• Reluctance to follow owners while being led and propensity to lie down during activity
• Will appear to have transitioned weight to back legs with back legs further forward
• Hooves may be warmer than normal with bounding pulses in the affected legs
• Pain response upon applying pressure to the foot

Even if your horse is not currently suffering from laminitis, prevent the condition now by observing their eating behavior. Consider a dry area where grass has been removed if you notice your horse excessively eating grass or create an area for your horse to roam that takes longer for them to reach the grass. A feeding muzzle will also allow your horse to graze, but in much smaller amounts. Limiting or removing their grain intake and alternating to beet sugar can also ensure your horse receives adequate nutrition, but without causing digestive inflammation that leads to laminitis.

Is your horse suffering from laminitis? A comprehensive treatment approach that focuses on reducing pain, modulating inflammation and improving overall stability is most ideal. Talk to your veterinarian for a specific treatment plan.

Location

Find us on the map

New Office Hours effective Dec. 1, 2018

Our Regular Schedule - Call for 24 hour emergency service 920-837-7766

Clinic Hours

Monday:

7:30 am-4:00 pm

Tuesday:

7:30 am-4:00 pm

Wednesday:

7:30 am-4:00 pm

Thursday:

7:30 am-4:00 pm

Friday:

7:30 am-4:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Testimonials

Feedback from our clients

  • ""Excellent and very knowledgeable clinic and staff. Very supportive of area's youth, their projects, and organizations!""
    MARTY NOWAK/LUXEMBURG, WI
  • ""It's been a pleasure to have Dr. Matt as my vet for the past 21 years. He and the staff at Dairyland have always been kind & helpful.""
    MARY PRISCO/GREEN BAY, WI
  • ""I cannot say enough about them! Very helpful with my potbelly pigs! I am so VERY happy I found them!!! They are so willing to help you and not deplete your bank acct!""
    SHAWN CRIBB/GREEN BAY
  • "We love you Dr. Matt! You helped Apollo keep his eye sight, you never got frustrated with my 5 million questions, you were very patient and always explained things so we could understand what was going on with him. Your staff is great at returning phone calls and making sure patients get exactly what they need. You have been the best vet ever."
    DENISE WERY/GREEN BAY
  • "I want to give a huge shout out to Dr Matt Schaefer with Dairyland Veterinary Service. I had been struggling to get weight on Kahlua. She wouldn't eat anything I put in front of her. Dr Matt came out and looked at her and we discussed her attitude and habits. He had a good feeling she had ulcers so he suggested treating her with ulcerguard. I got her on it and she is just 2 days from finishing the 28 day treatment. The change in her is phenomenal. She's put on weight and now looks perfect!
    And "
    ASHLEY THOMPSON